Right-to-Know: Safety Data Sheets (SDSs)

Welcome to “Right-to-Know: Safety Data Sheets (SDSs),” a video lesson that acts as a guide for the 16 sections that can be found in an SDS. This lesson is the last of four in the “New York State Right-to-Know Law” video course, which informs New York employees who work around chemicals about the legislation put in place to protect them from hazards. In this lesson, viewers will learn what an SDS is and the role it plays within an organization that houses chemical products. Learners will also become familiar with each section included in the document, including hazard identification, first-aid measures, toxicological information, and more.

Right-to-Know: Hazard Classification

Welcome to “Right-to-Know: Hazard Classification,” a video lesson designed to help learners understand the classes and categories of hazards they may be exposed to on the job. This lesson is the second of four in the “New York State Right-to-Know Law” video course, which informs New York employees who work around chemicals about the legislation put in place to protect them from hazards. During this lesson, viewers will learn about the various physical, health, and environmental hazards that toxic substances may pose. Learners will also consider the possible routes of entry a chemical can use to contact the body, as well as how exposure can affect them. In the end, viewers should recognize the role of hazard classification in understanding the risks associated with handling any chemical.

Right-to-Know: Federal and New York Standards

Welcome to the “Right-to-Know: Federal and State Standards” video lesson intended to describe the requirements laid out by the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) and the New York State Right-to-Know Law (RTK). This lesson is the first of four in the “New York State Right-to-Know Law” video course, which informs New York employees who work around chemicals about the legislation put in place to protect them from hazards. In this lesson, viewers will learn the four elements that must be addressed in a hazard communication program: hazardous substances on site, container labels, safety data sheets (SDSs), and site-specific training. Learners will also become familiar with the concepts that must be addressed in required training, as well as the rights they have under federal and state regulations.

Right-to-Know: Container Labels

Welcome to the “Right-to-Know: Container Labels” video lesson that goes through the six key elements that can be found on a chemical’s container label. This lesson is the third of four in the “New York State Right-to-Know Law” video course, which informs New York employees who work around chemicals about the legislation put in place to protect them from hazards. Throughout this lesson, learners will gain an understanding of what container labels look like and the value they provide to workers who handle toxic substances. In particular, viewers will learn about the two signal words—warning and danger—as well as the various pictograms that visually indicate specific information about a chemical’s hazards. Plus, learners will become acquainted with the hazard statements and precautionary statements located on a product’s container label. After watching this lesson, viewers should understand their employer’s responsibility when it comes to maintaining container labels and know how to gain needed information from them.

New York State Right-to-Know Law

Welcome to “New York State Right-to-Know Law,” a video course that informs New York employees who work around chemicals about the legislation put in place to protect them from hazards. This course, which comprises four video lessons, lays out the requirements established by the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) and the New York State Right-to-Know Law (RTK). Specifically, viewers will learn what their employer’s hazard communication program must entail, as well as their rights according to federal and state regulations. In addition, learners will consider the various classes and categories of hazards they may encounter on the job, along with how they might be exposed and how that exposure could affect their body. Plus, viewers will learn about container labels and safety data sheets as key sources of information on chemical hazards. Ultimately, learners should feel empowered to work safely around hazardous substances despite the risk of injury and illness.

To the Point About: The Hazard Communications Program

Our workplace is full of hazards, hazards that can hurt us or kill us. Controlling these hazards and preventing injuries is the point of our safety and health program. One such hazard is the one presented by hazardous chemicals. Protecting workers from exposure to hazardous chemicals can prevent injuries and illnesses. That is the point of our facility's hazard communication program and that is the point of this program. Topics include the three types of chemical hazards, what hazards each pictogram represents, information conveyed on chemical labels, hazard and precautionary statements, and important information that can be found on safety data sheets.